The Internet, the Pump & the Treasures

IMG_0235Here are the treasures! We pulled these rocks out of the septic tank pit and from the dirt piles.

Here I am climbing on the dirt piles looking for rocks.

Here I am climbing on the dirt piles looking for rocks…

...and in the pit!

…and in the pit!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The picture makes the pit look deeper than it is – it’s only seven feet deep. However, I should mention that one should never venture into an unsupported pit more than four feet deep. It could cave in and bury you! I only got to do it because Jason was watching. I was surprised to see a mole peek out of a hole in the pit. It must have moved in right after the pit was dug because moles don’t live seven feet under the ground.

This is the biggest rock we found. We tried to roll it up two sticks into the back of Jason's truck, but it was too heavy. It probably weighs 250 pounds. We'll use "Come'alongs" to pull it into the truck and put it over by the house site.

This is the biggest rock we found. We tried to roll it up two sticks into the back of Jason’s truck, but it was too heavy. It probably weighs 250 pounds. Jason plans to use “Come’alongs” to pull it into the truck and put it over by the house site. What will we do with it there? Visit us when the house is finished and see for yourself!

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This is like a Ditch Witch, but it makes a very thin trench and backfills it at the same time!

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I don’t know what Antonio is doing.

Further excitement ensued when Daniel and Antonio came out from La Jicarita Rural Telephone Cooperative and laid the DSL cable and the tubing for the fiber optic cable that is coming soon. Daniel said the fiber optic is ready, but “it has to be heated up.” I don’t know what that means. I just know we’re no longer burning through lots of data! Also we don’t have to connect my phone to the computer to watch our show anymore. The internet cable is ready for the garage with guest room too. The guys who did the work were very nice. When he left Daniel explained that they had to dig one small area by hand and said, “I hope we didn’t mess up your pasture.” I never imagined I would have a pasture, but I guess I do!

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Jason put the pipes into the tripod when it was on the ground then he walked it up. The silver thing is the pump.

We’re a lot closer to having running water now! Jason dropped the pump into the well. This sounds really easy – like you just toss the pump down a hole. Of course it’s not like that at all! The well is 125 feet deep and the pump runs on electricity so you have to put the pump at the end of long pipes for the water and attach electrical wire to the pipes. Jason built a giant tripod to hold the pipes upright while he taped on the electrical wire and connected them to each other.

The tubes are 20 feet long. He wrapped the ends with Teflon tape before he screwed them together.

The pipes are 20 feet long. He used six of them.

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He’s connecting two pieces of pipe. It doesn’t smell bad. He’s just wearing a mask because he has allergies!

This si a ?. It keeps the pump from just spinning around in the well.

This is a torque arrestor. It keeps the pump from just spinning around in the well.

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Here’s he’s wrapping the end of the pipe with Teflon tape. The green, red and black wire is the wire for the electricity to the pump. He used electrical tape to tape this on every four feet.

Rope holding the tube up?

The rope attached to the stake is to help lower the pump and the pipe and can be used to pull the pipe and pump back up.

It looked cool when a tube was waiting to be attached!

It looked cool when a pipe was waiting to be attached!

All done!

All done! Easy peasy!

This was Jason’s first time installing a well pump! He used the instructions on the pump and did some research, but he also just laid awake at night thinking about the best way to do this. Pumps have a five year warranty, but most people say they get seven or eight years out of them ~ so I guess he’ll get to do this all again some day!

Of course we can’t work (or watch other people work) all the time. One day we went to Santa Fe for no reason. We didn’t do any errands or anything productive at all. We took Lucky on an interesting walk in Hillside Park. There’s a path that winds up a hill to the old location of Fort Marcy. The Fort was only in use for about 20 years and has been abandoned since 1868 so all that remains in a small dirt mound that supposed to be part of an old wall. Along the way there are plaques that tell all about the history of Santa Fe. It was good that our outing had this physical and educational component because otherwise all we did was eat!

It started with chocolate sodas and a cherry chili truffle from Kakawa.

It started with chocolate sodas and a cherry chili truffle from Kakawa.

Then I had two types of sorbet ~ pineapple and sangria! Next …

...Jason had corn from a vendor on the plaza. I just had a bite.

…Jason had corn from a vendor on the plaza. I just had a bite.

 

 

 

 

 

We decided to take some treats from Chocolatesmith back to the Tin Can.

I love their green chili pistachio bark! We also bought some mocha almond bark, a cherry chocolate, a coconut chocolate and a chocolate covered orange peel.

I love their green chili pistachio bark! We also bought some mocha almond bark, a cherry chocolate, a coconut chocolate and a chocolate covered orange peel.

 

 

Of course we had to have some real food too! We picked up burritos from Bumble Bee’s Baja Grill before we left town. Everything I’ve had from this place has been great!

They warn you that they're slow. No problem...

They warn you that they’re slow. No problem!

And people wonder what vegans eat! haha

They make a yummy Margarita too! And people wonder what vegans eat ~ haha

 

 

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